Your Latest Game Industry News Round-up #20

Scope out a few of the game industry news stories from the last week below, hand-picked from across the world of games. This week’s focus touches events that happened last week (Hot Chips 2020) and that are happening this weekend (GDQ, Free Fortnite and DC FanDome), plus more!

Index:

 

Epic to Host an Online Fortnite Event to Amplify Their Argument Vs. Apple
Source: Business Insider

Free Fortnite logo on white background

“Free Fortnite” art (Image: Epic Games)

Following a couple weeks of tension in the form of business and legal moves and countermoves by Epic Games and Apple (and Google) over control of apps and revenue share in their respective app stores, Epic’s going more public with their position against Apple.

“Epic Games is taking another jab at Apple with a dedicated in-game Fortnite tournament called #FreeFortnite, which will give away prizes such as non-iOS devices and anti-Apple merchandise.

The tournament takes place on August 23, and prizes for players include an in-game skin of the “Tart Tycoon,” an apple-shaped character who fairly obviously represents Apple CEO Tim Cook. The character made an appearance in Epic’s send-up of Apple’s classic “1984” advert, in which the video game giant portrayed the iPhone maker as an evil monopolist.”

 


Speedrunning Event Hosted Without Live Fans
Source: Business Insider

GDQ logo

GDC (Image: GDQ)

“There’s a well-known catchphrase among fans of video game speedrunning, which goes: “That has never happened before.” It often comes up when the player, whose chief task is to finish a game as quickly as possible, encounters something unexpected or is searching for an excuse to explain away human error. The phrase has become particularly relevant in 2020, when nothing ever seems to go as expected.

This week, organizers of the world’s biggest series of live speedrunning competitions are holding their first Games Done Quick with no attendees. Since the nonstop event kicked off Sunday, there have been plenty of reminders of the abnormal circumstances. Audio feeds are inconsistent, and children occasionally photobomb their parents’ video streams. As the speedrunners are constantly reminded, this has never happened before.”

 


Some of the Biggest Reveals from DC FanDome
Source: CNET

Electric blue DC FanDome logo on black background

DC FanDome (Image: Warner Brothers)

DC is bringing many of its best known characters to an online event, which featured reveals that includes new Batman game, Gotham Knights. Check out the CNET story, linked above, for some of the biggest reveals today:

DC FanDome takes place in two parts — the first runs for 24 hours, starting at 10 a.m. PT this Saturday, Aug. 22. The second half follows on Sept. 12.

The event, aimed at fans of DC Comics, features online panels, cosplay, fan art and comics, as well as special events for kids. The devoted DC fandom will be especially excited for looks at some long-awaited DC properties, including the Snyder Cut of Justice LeagueRobert Pattinson as The Batman and James Gunn‘s The Suicide Squad.”

 


Xbox Series X Silicon Highlighted at Hot Chips 2020
Source: Eurogamer

Xbox Series X console with controller on black background

Microsoft Xbox Series X console (Image: Microsoft)

“Earlier this week, Microsoft took part in the Hot Chips 2020 symposium to deliver its now traditional console silicon breakdown, this time focusing on the core make-up of the Xbox Series X ‘Project Scarlett’ processor and how it compares to its predecessors. Not only did we learn more about the properties of the chip, we also gained an insight into the market conditions surrounding and influencing its design. The conclusion is inescapable: cutting-edge consumer electronics can still deliver generational gains in performance – Moore’s Law isn’t dead – but costs are rising and these are having a fundamental influence on the way Microsoft shaped its new console.”

 


Netflix’s High Score Video Game-themed Documentary Launched

Source: PC Gamer

High Score (Image: Netflix:]

With the launch of High Score on August 19, gamers got a fresh documentary about the art, science, and business of making games. While received with generally positive marks, High Score’s critical reviews are a bit less glowing than the consumer reviews. From PC Gamer, here’s one of the lukewarm reviews about this documentary:

“With a generic name like “High Score,” I expected Netflix’s documentary series about videogame history to be the sort of fluff that repeatedly points out how much games matter. Did you know that videogames make more money than Hollywood? That millions of people watch teenagers compete in League of Legends tournaments? That kind of thing.

Well, who am I, at PC Gamer, to complain about generic titles? I was surprised. I watched the two episodes of High Score that have to do with PC gaming—the third episode, which is about RPGs, and the last episode, which is partially about id Software—and they weren’t like that. They weren’t great, but they at least defied some of the traditions of mainstream videogame coverage.”

 


The Impact of Removing Paid Game Content
Source: Forbes

Destiny 2 logo on black background

Destiny 2 (Image: Bungie Inc.)

“Now that we have the full list of everything Destiny 2 is “vaulting” ie. deleting from the game with Beyond Light, I find myself pondering a question that has plagued the game since the content vault was announced.

What are the ethical or potentially legal implications of deleting previously paid-for content from a video game?”

That’s what this op-ed piece on Forbes aims to address, through the lens of Bungie’s Destiny 2 game.

 

Do you have interesting news to share, or something coming up that would also fit into this regular feature? Let us know!